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Oud is the general term given to the perfume oil extracted, using a variety of techniques, from the wood of the Agarwood tree. Oud oil has been previously discussed in detail in our previous blog here.


Bakhoor is usually the general term used to refer to, mainly wood chips, soaked in fragrant oils that can be burned to release their intoxicating fragrance.


Muattar or Mamool are terms used to refer specifically to chips of agarwood that are then soaked in fragrant oils. Mabsoos/Mabthooth is a specific term for when shavings of agarwood are also used and soaked in fragrant oils. However, the term bakhoor encompasses muattar, mamool and mabthooth.


Bakhoor can also be made from other natural ingredients such as sandalwood, resin, ambergris, or essential oils to name a few. The bricks of these natural ingredients are then soaked in fragrant and/or essential oils.


Unlike Oud oil, which can be worn directly unto the skin or used to fragrance clothing, bakhoor has to be burned. Bakhoor is burned using charcoal traditionally. The traditional incense burners are known as Mubkhara or Medhan, in the Arabic language.


The Mubkharas can be made from wood, ceramic or metal. The stage (where the bakhoor and coal is placed) is usually made from metal or ceramic. The most modern method involves using an electric incense burner. Purists will still prefer the coal burning mubkharas as they feel this gives out the best fragrance from the bakhoor.


  • Jan 11, 2019
  • Category: News
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